Communion

How often does your church offer communion? At my church, we have communion the first Sunday of every month.
2 Corinthians 12:10

Your money your singleness marriage talent and time
They were loaned to you to show the world that Christ is Divine ~Lecrae

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Our church has it about every first Sunday in the night.
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My church offers it every day. But it is different because I am a Catholic so it isn't the same as the rest of you guys.
PM if you want to be in my family! I can always use another sibling in my family of 13

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We do it maybe once a year. As of late, we do it around new years. Personally, I'd think doing it repeatedly could take away from the meaning. If you do it too often, it just becomes something you do on a regular basis and it doesn't feel as important.
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we do it sometimes, once a month sounds about right
We do it twice a year. Around Easter and then again in the fall. We had it 3 Sundays ago.
We have it a tad more often than you people. Every single mass, to be precise. Because Catholics actually believe, when Jesus said that the bread and wine was his body, that he meant just that. Of course, there is a fair amount of figurative language in the Bible, Catholics would be the first to acknowledge. Still, it's interesting how Protestants are traditionally the literalistic, and yet nearly all Protestants are staunchly non-literal on this issue.
The Foolish One wrote:We have it a tad more often than you people. Every single mass, to be precise. Because Catholics actually believe, when Jesus said that the bread and wine was his body, that he meant just that. Of course, there is a fair amount of figurative language in the Bible, Catholics would be the first to acknowledge. Still, it's interesting how Protestants are traditionally the literalistic, and yet nearly all Protestants are staunchly non-literal on this issue.
"And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is My body.
And He took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it;
For this is My blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins." -Matthew 26:26-28 KJV

"And He took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is My body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of Me.
Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in My blood, which is shed for you." -Luke 22:19-20 KJV

I believe Jesus gave the bread and wine as a symbol. "This do in remembrance of Me." I know some mega churches hold communion only once a month or so, due to their size I assume. But I don't think that communion should be limited to only church services. Bread and wine (or juice) is so common to have, I get the idea that Jesus was giving it to us as a symbol so that we can remember it often. We are saved only by grace, through Jesus' death sacrifice on the cross. Because we are sinners and have fleshly strongholds within our lives, we must be reminded of this often!
Really, however, communion is a matter of the heart. Do we take communion simply because Jesus commanded it, and it's what our church does however often, or do we take communion in grateful humility, knowing that apart from His grace, we are helpless, wretched sinners?
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"Seven times a day do I praise thee because of thy righteous judgments." Psalm 119:164
It becomes more a ritual if you do it as the Catholics do it. I have never taken part in Communion since I have never been baptized or joined a church because of my constant moving.
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So the order to do it in order to remember him is indicative of it being a symbol of Jesus rather than Jesus himself? Are the presents you will receive to commemorate Jesus' birth merely symbolic of presents? In the baptism we do in remembrance of the traditions of the Gospel, is the spirit that comes upon you only symbolic of the Holy Spirit? Is renewing your wedding vows in remembrance of your wedding day only a symbol of the vows you originally took?
And naturally we are reminded of it often, Sunshine. In fact, there are Catholic churches in nearly every American city, and many of them have communion every single day, far more often than Protestants.
@Bren, what is that supposed to even mean? How can it just be a ritual? It is indeed ritual, but it is also the highlight of our mass.
It's definitely a matter that each individual should consider. Thank you for challenging what I said, as it does make me think twice about why I believe what I believe. (: Whatever the case, it's good to remember that no matter which way an individual believes on that particular part of communion, Jesus said to do it in remembrance Him. Even though you and I may be in disagreement about that particular part of communion, we are both ultimately taking communion for the same purpose.
By the way, I like what you mentioned about how many Catholic churches hold communion every day. I think it's important for each follower of Jesus to evaluate how frequently, or infrequently as the case may be, they take communion. In Acts 2:42 it says about the early church, "Day by day continuing with one mind in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house..."
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"Seven times a day do I praise thee because of thy righteous judgments." Psalm 119:164
First post on the new forum:) Several of you don't know me, I'll go do an introduction in a minute.

We do communion every week (Sunday). For us (my family/church) we go off of what we see the early church doing in Acts. It looks like according to Acts 2 they did it when they got together multiple times a week. And while my church doesn't do this because we aren't all together throughout the week, we do it every time we are together. The service revolves around it, since we believe everything we do should revolve around the gospel of Christ. :) [ I love that part of the service! It brings me to reflect on the only reason I am who I am in Christ. To remember just what He has done. ♥]

As far as whether it's a symbol or not, TFO, you believe that it is actually Jesus' body. Sunny, you believe that it is a symbol. Although you guys believe these things, you're both partaking of communion as Christ commanded, and it means the same thing: Remembering Christ's sacrifice on our behalf.
It can be good and even fruitful to discuss why we believe what we believe, however, Christ wants His body of believers to be close and live as brothers and sisters.
I'd like to encourage you both to be sure that your discussion brings you closer as a family and builds you stronger in your faith first and foremost, being alert of long debates that will push us farther apart without need.
And I say this because I've done the opposite too many times, and put distance in relationships I'm likely never to get back.
You're welcome, and thank you kindly in return for replying.
Again, Jesus did indeed say to do it remembrance of him. I'll ask you again. When one renews your wedding vows in remembrance of your wedding, are those vows a mere symbol of the first wedding?
Do you admit that Jesus' words in no way indicate the Eucharist is only a symbol?
I agree it's up to us as individuals to decide how often to receive communion, assuming we receive it at least once a week. Unless it's the fake kind. If it's not Jesus' true body and blood, what's the point? To remember Jesus' suffering and resurrection? Very important, but the true Euacharist has a purpose in addition to that. To enter full communion with Christ through ingesting his physical body.
PS The King's Daughter, lovely to have you here, but how on earth can you say receiving Jesus is the same as receiving a symbolic cracker?
Ah, fair enough. There is a difference. But my point was simply that you are both doing as our Lord has directed. Neither make you any less saved by Him.::)
I'll agree, fair enough. I just wanted to say the main point is not the same, despite what you said. But, I'm still not sure exactly what this Protestant idea of being saved is. It seems to be used many different ways. If you just mean whichever way you receive communion makes you no less Christian, you're quite right.
The Foolish One wrote:Do you admit that Jesus' words in no way indicate the Eucharist is only a symbol?
I agree it's up to us as individuals to decide how often to receive communion, assuming we receive it at least once a week. Unless it's the fake kind. If it's not Jesus' true body and blood, what's the point? To remember Jesus' suffering and resurrection? Very important, but the true Euacharist has a purpose in addition to that. To enter full communion with Christ through ingesting his physical body.

First of all, yes, I do admit that Jesus' words in no way indecate that the communion is only a symbol. I see your point there. But I'm confused about the second part that you said. I don't see anything in Jesus' words indicating that this is neccesary to enter into full communion with Christ through the ingesting of His physical body. It seems to me that if this is important enough to the entering in to full communion with Christ, the subject would be directly addressed in the Bible. Would you be able to explain more, please?
:chinscratch:

By the way, thanks TKD. :)
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"Seven times a day do I praise thee because of thy righteous judgments." Psalm 119:164
Those words, no. Sorry, I did not mean to say that verse proves transubstantiation.
Anyhow, here's where Jesus said it: "Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you have no life in you."
There y'go. Protestants generally interpret this to mean Jesus meant it was symbol. "Oh, Jesus could've meant this, this, or this. But could he have meant just what he said? Nah, that's just silly."
Interpret away, but you won't receive the special grace having God physically within you brings your life.
My church takes communion every sunday.

@PF, so you think you're actually eating Christ's literal flesh and blood...? O_o Sounds like cannibalism to me...and in turn that sounds kinda...dare I say it...dumb. Sorry. o_o
Finally, somebody said it. Yes, Metal, it does sound rather dumb, so does miraculously healing someone with parts of a dead fish from an angel. However Metal,cannibalism is eating something that is made of human flesh. The essence of the Eucharist is Jesus body, but it is made of bread. Wood may be cut into the form of a chair, but it is wood. Christ may be in the form of bread and wine, but it is Christ.
The Foolish One wrote: Christ may be in the form of bread and wine, but it is Christ.


Aaaand you're eating him. o_O "For as for the life of all flesh, its blood is identified with its life. Therefore I said to the sons of Israel, You are not to eat the blood of any flesh, for the life of all flesh is its blood; whoever eats it shall be cut off," (Lev. 17:14).

In regards to the concept of the communion...

There's no indication that the whole "This is my body...", "This is my blood..." thing was to be taken literally. We DO see verses referring to the bread and wine as the body and the blood, but we also see Jesus stating that the words He was speaking were spiritual words when talking about eating his flesh and drinking his blood: "It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh profits nothing; the words that I have spoken to you are spirit and are life," (John 6:63). He didn't say they were literal words; that is, He didn't say that they were His actual body and blood.

You've stated before that the "This is my body...", "This is my blood..." thing(Maybe I need a new term for it...XD) should be taken literally. Jesus DID say "This is my body" and "This is my blood", and at first glance it would seem like he meant it literally, but you have to realize that Jesus spoke in spiritual terms quite a bit. Here's some examples: "I am the bread of life," (John 6:48); "I am the door," (John 10:7,9); "I am the resurrection and the life," (John 11:25); "I am the true vine," (John 15:1), etc. Does Jesus become a literal door at random intervals? ... Probably not. Jesus also described himself as a lamb. Does Jesus become a sheep once in a while? ... I doubt it. How about a vine? ... See what I'm saying?
In the context of John 6, Jesus is telling his disciples that they must eat his body and blood (John 6:53). But later on he claims he was speaking in spiritual terms, "...the words that I have spoken to you are spirit and are life," (John 6:63).


Also, the wine and the bread were still called their respected names after the supper. After Jesus said "This is my blood..." (Matthew 26:28), he said, "But I say to you, I will not drink of this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink it new with you in My Fathers kingdom," (Matt. 26:29). So... Why would Jesus speak figuratively of his blood as "The fruit of the vine" if it was his literal blood? He called it wine.

Here's an excerpt from Corinthians: "For I received from the Lord that which I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus in the night in which He was betrayed took bread; 24 and when He had given thanks, He broke it, and said, "This is My body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of Me." 25 In the same way He took the cup also, after supper, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in My blood; do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me." 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes. 27 Therefore whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner, shall be guilty of the body and the blood of the Lord. 28 But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of the bread and drink of the cup," (1 Cor. 11:23-28). If the bread and wine were changed and were really bread and wine, then why does Paul refer to the bread as bread and not the literal body of Christ? ... Good question. One I think I know the answer to.

There was no indication that the disciples thought that the bread and the wine were his literal body and blood. No where in that bible.

Question: Is it a tradition of the Catholic church to...worship the bread and wine? I mean if it IS Christ, then why not worship it? If that's what catholics do, then that's not supported by scripture either.

Now, the Catholic "Mass" is supposed to be a reenactment of the sacrifice of Christ, right? If so, then therefore, according to Catholic theology, the bread and wine become the broken body and shed blood of Christ and are, somehow, the crucified body and blood of Christ... But how does this work since Jesus instituted the Supper before He was crucified? Are we supposed to conclude that at the Last Supper, when they were all at the table, that when Jesus broke the bread it actually became His sacrificial body -- even though the sacrifice had not yet happened? Also are we supposed to conclude that when Jesus gave the wine that it became His actual sacrificial blood -- even though the sacrifice had not yet happened? That makes no sense. o_o

Ok. I'm just gonna say this outright. It seems to me that this "transubstantiation" thing is a violation of the incarnation. o_O The biblical doctrine of the incarnation states that the Word which was God and was with God (John 1:1), became flesh and dwelt among us (John 1:14). This "became flesh" involves what is known as the hypostatic Union. You probably know what that is, but just in case the phrase seems unfamiliar to you, this is the teaching that in the one person of Christ are two natures: divine and human. That is, Jesus is both God and man at the same time. By definition, for Jesus to be human He must be located in one place. This is the way humans work. A human male does not have the ability to be omnipresent. He can only be in one place at one time. To say that Jesus in His physical form is in more than one place at a time, is (In the long run) to deny the incarnation. That is, it denies that Jesus is completely and totally a man -- since a man can only be it one place at one time. Therefore, to say that the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ is to violate the doctrine of the incarnation by stating that Christ is physically present all over the planet as the mass is celebrated. This is a problem and appears to be a serious denial of the true and absolute incarnation of the Word of God as a man.

It doesn't add up. None of it does.

but you won't receive the special grace having God physically within you


Special grace?? O_o What special grace?

so does miraculously healing someone with parts of a dead fish from an angel.


Wuuuut??? When did that happen? O_O
CCTZ
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